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Study of Mark: Mark 1:29-34 April 30, 2009

Posted by Warren in The Gospel of Mark.
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Mark 1:29-34 ESV
(29) And immediately he left the synagogue and entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John.
(30) Now Simon’s mother-in-law lay ill with a fever, and immediately they told him about her.
(31) And he came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and the fever left her, and she began to serve them.
(32) That evening at sundown they brought to him all who were sick or oppressed by demons.
(33) And the whole city was gathered together at the door.
(34) And he healed many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons. And he would not permit the demons to speak, because they knew him.

Mark starts detailing Jesus’ ministry in Galilee with the account of Christ healing Peter’s mother-in-law. Partially because Mark is telling Peter’s story of Christ, partly because it shows Christ’s ministry starting close to home, the story is fascinating to me. As soon as Jesus heals her, she starts ministering to the disciples. She sees the work that God has for her, and does it gladly.

Our position is a lot like Peter’s mother-in-law’s position. We need healing — healing that can only be provided by Christ. He comes to us, and heals us. What do we do then? Are we like the ten lepers, nine of whom never bothered giving thanks to the one who healed them? Or are we like Peter’s mother-in-law, knowing what we are called to do, and doing it gladly? Or do we sit somewhere in between — knowing what God wants us to do, and yet not quite ready to do it. Wanting to do something else. Like the ear saying “I want to be an eye. If I can’t see, I’m not doing anything”. God has something for each of us to do for His kingdom — but we are responsible for doing it.

Christ has more trouble with demons in this passage. He casts them out, commanding them to be silent. He doesn’t want people to hear about Him from demons — that is the job He has for His followers. He also doesn’t want there to be any question about the source of His power — if demons are testifying to His true identity, there may be some confusion about who He really is. And, as we will see later, there was.

As Christians, we need to make sure that we are the ones who are telling the world about Christ. Otherwise, we end up with the John Dominick Crossans and John Shelby Spongs telling people about a Christ that they aren’t sure even existed, based on a Bible that is completely flawed and unreliable. We have Peter Jennings assembling a group of scholars who don’t believe in the topic of their search. We have The Last Temptation of Christ and other Hollywood blasphemies. The Church needs to speak out, and not worry that we will be mocked (as we have been for the reaction to The DaVinci Code).

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